Category Archives: Uncategorized

Putting his money where his content is

Opportunities and Threats for Social Media

The future of social media as viewed by senior UK marketers

I will be following, with great interest, a very brave Brit who is attempting to prove that content marketing really works — in a matter of hours.

On May 19th, next Wednesday, John Bottom of BaseOne in London will be attempting this live at the IDM B2B conference in front of 150 senior marketers.  What’s more, Mr. Bottom will originate the content right then and there, and then look to prove its effectiveness by gaining 1,000 clicks to its posting.

I think he’ll achieve it.

He has laid some groundwork to help set his stage:   leveraging some content marketing of his own and spreading it through a variety of social media channels to like-minded fans of content marketing.  So then, on May 19th, when the content goes “live,” he’ll have enlisted the help of a community that believes in its power and wants John to succeed.

In a way, these before-efforts are already proving the effectiveness of content marketing…and his exercise on Wednesday will simply re-confirm them.

Join me in helping him out by spreading his message on 5/19/10.

Just follow this to read more:  http://bit.ly/9LLk0C

And here is the content to be spread on Wednesday:  http://bit.ly/cUOsuY.

Best of luck, John.  But I’m a believer in making your own luck, and I’m confident you have.

Customer Engagement means asking “are your customers really engaged?”

Customer Engagement:  a calling, a passion, a way of life.

But just what do we mean when we say “engaging advertising” or “engaging content” or even “engaging experience”?  Can we agree on what it means to be engaging to our customers?

My colleague, Joe Pulizzi from Junta42 and I were stymied by this and decided to do something about it.

The result:  an engaging whitepaper on Engagement, with ideas, theories, and practical applications to help you better understand Engagement, apply metrics to measure it, and view some terrific examples to help you achieve it.

Customer Engagement whitepaper

Engagement: Understanding It, Measuring It, Achieving It

Download your free copy here, no registration required!

All that we ask is that you share it with your friends and colleagues.

Enjoy!

Engagement is a strategy, not a metric

with this ring

Interesting take on engagement by Gene Liebel at Adweek (So You’re Engaged — Now What?)

I’m positive many marketers indeed look to ‘engagement’ as the new metric:

MarketingGuy 1988:  “We need reach!”
MarketingGuy 2008:  “We need engagement!”

Yes, marketers need to engage their customers/prospects, but engagement isn’t a metric, or even a goal — engagement is a route to the goal.

Whether the objective is awareness, consideration, interaction, transaction, bonding, advocacy, or any other label on a stage in the Customer Journey, engagement is the chief means to achieving that goal. And that, by definition, is a strategy.

What then is engagement? My definition is the customer-centric need being fulfilled not necessarily by the purchasing of your brand, but rather by your actions as a brand: information, education, entertainment, inspiration = problem solving. Think about being “engaged,” such as by a professional speaker. S/he likely delivers on all of the above.

Yes, time-spent, page views, clicks are all metrics that can help define ‘engagement,’ but they are by far not the only ones. ‘Engaged’ prospects/customers also visit more frequently, are more apt to cross-purchase/up-purchase, and ultimately become the strongest advocates for your brand. They sign up for e-newsletters and RSS feeds, they download whitepapers and attend webinars, they refer friends and forward pages, and they talk you up in social media settings.

Engagement means different things depending on the objective of the marketing stage.  ‘Engagement’ in the reach phases is still very wide-net-casting, with the greater in-depth engagement occurring in later stages of the Customer Journey.   Hence, metrics used to measure the objectives achieved via Engagement differ as well.

Oftentimes, the bulk of engagement resources (e.g. Content Marketing) demand back-load weighting/allocation, as customers likely deserve greater attention than suspects, and advocates more so than customers.

Different stages of customers?  Mixed allocations of resources based on customer groupings?  Migration of customers from one stage to another?  Different metrics in place to measure different stage objectives?  Smells an awful lot like CRM.

As it should.  Engagement is a close relative of CRM. And like CRM, the end goals of engagement are sales and maximizing LTV. Engagement isn’t the end goal, or even a metric…it’s a strategy.

MarketingGuy 2009:  “We need sales and LTV:  let’s focus on engagement.”